Current Actions

  • (No Title)

    Fair Pay Now for JCPS Employees

     "After hearing from a string of speakers arguing both sides, the Jefferson County Board of Education voted Monday night to keep tax rates the same for fiscal year 2015...  Superintendent Donna Hargens said the district could avoid a tax hike and still serve students sufficiently..."  This leaves no reason why JCPS should not bargain fairly with Educational Employees, however...

    • JCPS still refuses to offer more than the 1% state-mandated raise to Classified Employees (which include instructional assistants, technical employees, clerks, bookkeepers, and others who make an average salary of $18,500),
    • JCPS still wants to freeze STEP raises for Classified Employees, 
    • JCPS is still intent on stripping these Classified Employees of their "me too clause"; and
    • JCPS Teachers may still have to purchase supplies for their classrooms out of their own money again this year;

    This is not how our Educational Employees should be treated.  This is not how we want to teach our children about the value we place on their education.  This is not okay!  Join us today in letting the JCPS Board of Education know that it's time to bargain fairly with Educational Employees today!

  • (No Title)

    It's Time For JCPS to Invest in Our Children 

    Jefferson County Public Schools are governered by the Board of Education, who are tasked with being the strongest advocate body for children in the school district.  This school year (2014-15) the Board of Education, once again, may not fully fund Jefferson County Public Schools.  If this happens, it will be the children who reap the negative benefits, once again.  

    We urge you to send emails to the JCPS Board of Education and the JCPS Superintendent ASAP urging them to invest in our children & fully fund Jefferson County Public Schools.  Here are the details:

    1.       The school board has NOT consistently fully-funded our district at the allowable 4% property tax level for a number of years.

    2.       Every year that the school board does not fully fund our district, it lowers the funding base for the next year.  That is funding that will be missing year after year and can never be restored.  “It’s the harm that keeps on harming!”

    3.       When the school board does not fully fund the district, it harms our most vulnerable students the most – special needs students, low-income students, and English language learners.

    4.       Economic studies show that every dollar we invest in our public schools today pays for itself many times over in the future by improving graduation and college-going rates, increasing employment rates, and decreasing crime rates.

    5.       Every employee group in JCPS has lost ground to inflation for each of the past three years.

    6.       Members of the school board should be our community’s strongest advocates for assuring that our schools have all the funding and resources they can possibly have, so we can help every student succeed.

    7.       Thousands of classified employees in JCPS do not earn a living wage.  We know poverty is the enemy of education, so why doesn’t the school board pay these employees a living wage?  When we have asked this question, we have been told the school board just doesn’t have enough money to pay them a living wage.  Well, if this is true, why in the world our school board not have been collecting the full funding for our district?

    8.       Providing for our students with the full school funding rate would mean the median Jefferson County home owner would be investing an additional five cents per day ($1.50 per month, or about $18 per year) in our community’s children.

    9.       Investing in our public schools is one of the best and most economical ways to improve/maintain home real estate values. Investing in well-funded public schools more than pays for itself because good public schools significantly improve home values.

    10.   The school board’s legislative priorities include increased funding for our schools.  Shouldn’t the school board be willing to do exactly what it’s asking legislators to do by funding our district at the highest level it can, so we can help every student succeed?  Shouldn’t the school board set the right example for our legislators?

    11.   Many families with children in JCPS schools that are providing free meals will save more on their children’s meals this school year than the cost of the full school funding rate.

    12.   Not utilizing the full allowable school funding rate sends the wrong message to legislators by effectively saying, “Our district has plenty of funds.  In fact, we don’t even need to utilize the full rate allowed to us by the legislature.”

    13.   What more important investment could there be for our community to make than to invest in our children?

     

  • (No Title)

    It's Time For JCPS to Invest in Our Children 

    Jefferson County Public Schools are governered by the Board of Education, who are tasked with being the strongest advocate body for children in the school district.  This school year (2014-15) the Board of Education, once again, may not fully fund Jefferson County Public Schools.  If this happens, it will be the children who reap the negative benefits, once again.  

    We urge you to send emails to the JCPS Board of Education and the JCPS Superintendent ASAP urging them to invest in our children & fully fund Jefferson County Public Schools.  Here are the details:

    1.       The school board has NOT consistently fully-funded our district at the allowable 4% property tax level for a number of years.

    2.       Every year that the school board does not fully fund our district, it lowers the funding base for the next year.  That is funding that will be missing year after year and can never be restored.  “It’s the harm that keeps on harming!”

    3.       When the school board does not fully fund the district, it harms our most vulnerable students the most – special needs students, low-income students, and English language learners.

    4.       Economic studies show that every dollar we invest in our public schools today pays for itself many times over in the future by improving graduation and college-going rates, increasing employment rates, and decreasing crime rates.

    5.       Every employee group in JCPS has lost ground to inflation for each of the past three years.

    6.       Members of the school board should be our community’s strongest advocates for assuring that our schools have all the funding and resources they can possibly have, so we can help every student succeed.

    7.       Thousands of classified employees in JCPS do not earn a living wage.  We know poverty is the enemy of education, so why doesn’t the school board pay these employees a living wage?  When we have asked this question, we have been told the school board just doesn’t have enough money to pay them a living wage.  Well, if this is true, why in the world our school board not have been collecting the full funding for our district?

    8.       Providing for our students with the full school funding rate would mean the median Jefferson County home owner would be investing an additional five cents per day ($1.50 per month, or about $18 per year) in our community’s children.

    9.       Investing in our public schools is one of the best and most economical ways to improve/maintain home real estate values. Investing in well-funded public schools more than pays for itself because good public schools significantly improve home values.

    10.   The school board’s legislative priorities include increased funding for our schools.  Shouldn’t the school board be willing to do exactly what it’s asking legislators to do by funding our district at the highest level it can, so we can help every student succeed?  Shouldn’t the school board set the right example for our legislators?

    11.   Many families with children in JCPS schools that are providing free meals will save more on their children’s meals this school year than the cost of the full school funding rate.

    12.   Not utilizing the full allowable school funding rate sends the wrong message to legislators by effectively saying, “Our district has plenty of funds.  In fact, we don’t even need to utilize the full rate allowed to us by the legislature.”

    13.   What more important investment could there be for our community to make than to invest in our children?

     

  • (No Title)

    MSD Workers at the Central Maintenance Facility are under attack!

    On April 28th, Kentucky Jobs with Justice, along with over 20 community partners, allies, and workers attended the MSD Board Hearing on behalf of the MSD Workers at the Central Maintenance Facility.  At the hearing, three issues were highlighted

    • That these workers have not had a raise in three years, despite the excessive compensation package for the Executive Director of MSD;
    • That these workers do not have binding arbitration, which hampers their ability to be treated fairly on all grevance proceedings; and
    • That the treatment of the MSD CMF Workers appears to be based on discrimination, when compared with their counterparts at Louisville Water Company...

    You can read more about the issues at the Central Maintenance Facility here

    -->> On April 29th, the MSD Workers at the Central Maintenance Facility began reporting that they "are being told by supervision that if they don't be careful, Metro will privatize their jobs".   To date, workers are anonymously reporting harassing comments made to them, and with negotiations set to resume in a few short weeks, this can seriously hamper the workers ability to bargain confidently and free from harassment.

    This seemingly amounts to intimidation and possible retaliation against the MSD CMF Workers, and cannot be written off as a coincidence.  This is a critical juncture in this fight on behalf of the MSD Workers at the Central Maintenance Facility and they need your support NOW!  

    Show your support for MSD Workers at the Central Maintenance Facility and send an email  


  • (No Title)

    Raise the Wage in Lexington

    One of the key ways we can build an economy that works for everyone, and not just those at the top, would be to put more money in the pockets of workers. This would not only help those workers who would receive a wage increase, but it could also boost the economy.

    Currently, a worker making the federal minimum wage of $7.25 an hour and raising two children is struggling to make ends meet. Assuming a minimum-wage employee works full time and takes no vacations, she or he will earn just $15,080 a year. This is $4,000 below the poverty line for a family of three. According to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, or MIT, families in Lexington need $45,605 to meet minimum standards of living. In Lexington, the average cost of housing each month for a worker with two children is $684, while the average cost of food is $536.22 The monthly minimum-wage income of $1,257 barely covers these expenses.

    Raising the minimum wage from $7.25 to $10.10 would increase a minimum-wage worker’s annual earnings to $19,777.23 When workers’ wages increase, they have more money to spend on things such as microwaves, school supplies, and even child care. This boost in demand for goods and services will help stimulate the economy and create opportunities for all Americans.

    If you agree that it's time to raise the minimum wage in Lexington, sign the petition and show your support today!

    SIGN NOW >>

    Fill out the Survey here


  • (No Title)

    Raise the Minimum Wage in Louisville

     One of the key ways we can build an economy that works for everyone, and not just those at the top, would be to put more money in the pockets of workers. This would not only help those workers who would receive a wage increase, but it could also boost the economy.

     Currently, a worker making the federal minimum wage of $7.25 an hour and raising two children is struggling to make ends meet. Assuming a minimum-wage employee works full time and takes no vacations, she or he will earn just $15,080 a year. This is $4,000 below the poverty line for a family of three. According to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, or MIT, families in Louisville need $44,914 to meet minimum standards of living. In Louisville, the average cost of housing each month for a worker with two children is $684, while the average cost of food is $536.22 The monthly minimum-wage income of $1,257 barely covers these expenses.

     Raising the minimum wage from $7.25 to $10.10 would increase a minimum-wage worker’s annual earnings to $19,777.23 When workers’ wages increase, they have more money to spend on things such as microwaves, school supplies, and even child care. This boost in demand for goods and services will help stimulate the economy and create opportunities for all Americans.

    Sign the Petition to Support Raising the Minimum Wage in Louisville


  • (No Title)

    Mayor Fischer: West Louisville Needs Transparency!

    "The vacant lot at 18th and Broadway, site of the old Philip Morris plant. Broader economic stress and social problems on the West Broadway corridor, the Russell neighborhood, and West Louisville in general.  When the city tore down the tobacco plant, it promised a mixed-use development with housing, retail, restaurants, and offices.2 But now under the cloak of a confidentiality agreement, the city is pursuing a Walmart instead.

    When Walmart enters a community it disrupts economic relations, drives people out of business, and ends up costing as many jobs as it creates.  Wages are so low that Walmart employees are below the poverty line and depend on government assistance Wealth is sucked out of the community and ends up in Bentonville, Arkansas. Walmart pays the absolute least of all large corporations in America.  It draws communities into dependence on it – by shutting down its competitors – and then, frequently, abandons its stores, leaving big empty shells.  Walmart creates fewer than six jobs per acre, while small businesses create many times more.

    But if not Walmart, What?  First and most important, engage the community. No more confidentiality agreements and closed-door meetings."**

    **read the full report by the Kentucky Labor Institute here

    SIGN NOW >>



  • (No Title)

    Kentucky Jobs with Justice Pledge

    I'll be there at least five times over the next year...

    ...standing up for our rights as working people for a decent standard of living;

    ...supporting the rights of all workers to bargain collectively;

    ...fighting for secure family-wage jobs in the face of corporate attacks on working people and our communities;

    ...organizing the unorganized to take aggressive action to secure a better economic future for all of us;

    ...mobilizing those already organized to join the fight for jobs with justice. 

    PLEDGE NOW >>



  • (No Title)

    Make Louisville a Compassionate AND Friendly City

     We are urging the Metro Louisville and Jefferson County community to take a stand by passing a Friendly City Ordinance. A Friendly City Ordinance will significantly increase the safety of the county, while recognizing  the human dignity of each person. Louisville will be aligning with over 134 cities nationwide by initiating this ordinance and this will be one more reason why Louisville is truly the leader in being a Compassionate City. 

    The Friendly City Ordinance will : 
    • Affirm that Louisville/Jefferson County is Compassionate AND Friendly.
    • Prohibit the checking of immigration/citizenship status during the reporting of crimes. 
    • Prohibit the use of county funds to perform immigration checks (there is already a federal system in place for everyone booked in a jail).
    • Ensure that persons cannot be stopped and then detained solely based on immigration status, perceived status, perceived national origin or ability to speak English, or based on their name by anyone employed by Louisville/Jefferson County.
    Tell the Louisville Metro Council that Jefferson County needs a Friendly City Ordinance to be Friendly AND Compassionate.

    SIGN NOW >>



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